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Xeodrifter diary #12

GN Podcast #479
 

Nintendo begins claiming Mario Kart 8 footage/music in direct-feed YouTube videos



If you upload your video through Mario Kart 8 itself, you already know this is happening. If you are doing your own direct-feed footage, the jig is up. Nintendo is claiming that content as well. Thanks to Josh for the heads up!

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26 total comments (View all)
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 16:56

@shellshocker This is through a capture device, not MKTV (although MKTV does it as well). Youtube was able to recognize it because of the music playing. So if you do an LP without audio (you speaking over it) it shouldn't get identified, at least I think it won't
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 16:56

I still feel like this is stupid....I want to side with Nintendo, and legally they are 100% within their rights to do this, but you put the features in the game and people are using it to get others into the game and hopefully get them to buy it. This does nothing to help Nintendo, nothing.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 17:07

Tesio wrote:I still feel like this is stupid....I want to side with Nintendo, and legally they are 100% within their rights to do this, but you put the features in the game and people are using it to get others into the game and hopefully get them to buy it. This does nothing to help Nintendo, nothing.


It's to prevent people from making money off of the videos. They still are shown on youtube just fine
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 17:09

Nintendo's within their legal rights to do this, but it doesn't mean they should be. They're the only ones getting uptight about LP videos and all this does is put them in a negative light. This doesn't help their image in the slightest. Nintendo's not some specialty case that deserves special treatment when no one else is doing this.
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03 Jun 2014 17:10

TheDreamingHawk wrote:
Tesio wrote:I still feel like this is stupid....I want to side with Nintendo, and legally they are 100% within their rights to do this, but you put the features in the game and people are using it to get others into the game and hopefully get them to buy it. This does nothing to help Nintendo, nothing.


It's to prevent people from making money off of the videos. They still are shown on youtube just fine


I don't think you're quite understanding the point he's trying to make...
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 17:43

@Shaanyboi
It doesn't matter what everyone else is doing. What's right is right and that's that.
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03 Jun 2014 17:51

Shaanyboi wrote:Nintendo's within their legal rights to do this, but it doesn't mean they should be. They're the only ones getting uptight about LP videos and all this does is put them in a negative light. This doesn't help their image in the slightest. Nintendo's not some specialty case that deserves special treatment when no one else is doing this.


What are you even talking about? You're outing yourself as having very superficial knowledge of the subject. This is youtube's algorithm detecting and flagging content, and has been a large issue for awhile. This does NOT just affect Nintendo, but all content makers. There are games from Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, and the bevvy of third parties all getting content claimed here and there. And in this case there isn't even commentary, it's straight up gameplay footage that's being monetized.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 17:52

I found out that the 30 seconds clip doesn't get claimed, but the one minute ones does. Still have not tested the 45 seconds ones.
It's actually quite funny that these MK videos are the first ones I got that have copyright claims, when I uploaded Pokemon footage (both anime and game) and some Animal Crossing New Leaf.

Also, yeah, it's not really Nintendo that is flagging these videos, it's YouTube auto flagging it with some video/sound recognition software.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 18:14

@Shaanyboi

No.

Square Enix does the same thing. I've used their in game recording feature such as the one included in Dissidia 012 and I got the same "this video is owned by SE" thing. It's not exclusive to Nintendo.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 18:30

I will post this every time Nintendo is being a dick about this:

Image
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 18:41

I don't think these kinds of videos should be taken down. I don't necessarily like "Let's Plays" (because most people talking over gameplay is just goddamn annoying). But LONG Plays? Sure. I like those, and those should stay. However, especially when it's just footage of you playing the game and nothing else, no real effort put into it, people really don't have the right to be making money off of just that. Youtube (or really, Google, who now controls them), set this whole mess up by really pushing the "monetization" BS on people. So now every no-nothing clown thinks they should be making money off of posting videos, even if it's literally just them posting a song or something stupid like that.

Not everybody needs to be monetizing videos....so in part, you can thank Youtube for getting crappier and pushing that on everybody. Youtube was WAY better before ads started coming into play.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 18:46

I prefer Nintendo earning the ad revenue to "Let's Players." That way, we all get better games, hardware, and events funded from it.
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03 Jun 2014 18:55

ChozoBoy wrote:I prefer Nintendo earning the ad revenue to "Let's Players." That way, we all get better games, hardware, and events funded from it.


But then a very strong source of free advertising gets dissuaded from playing Nintendo games. Whatever you think of let's players, it's impossible to deny how valuable they can be when it comes to marketing.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 19:01

They are about to start up that affiliate program, and knowing how YouTube can be I get the feeling that it can't tell the difference between MKTV and other direct feed videos anyway.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 19:14

@Sisibakbak
It's NOT advertising. They aren't talking about how you should by the game. It's usually just a vlog with a game in the background. It's ENTERTAINMENT and NOT ADVERTISEMENT.

I could be playing Mario Kart 8 and I'm just talking about my job and how I can't wait for Guardians of the Galaxy and Sony's E3 conference. That isn't advertising. Don't say it is.
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03 Jun 2014 19:57

LegendofSantiago wrote:@shellshocker This is through a capture device, not MKTV (although MKTV does it as well). Youtube was able to recognize it because of the music playing. So if you do an LP without audio (you speaking over it) it shouldn't get identified, at least I think it won't


We've had videos claimed where we spoke over the entire thing

Elfteiroh wrote:Also, yeah, it's not really Nintendo that is flagging these videos, it's YouTube auto flagging it with some video/sound recognition software.


...which Nintendo provides them the information for, since they endorse the process. Nintendo is 100% involved and responsible for this. Whether or not you think that's right or not is another matter, but Nintendo is not a helpless party here.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 20:24

OmnipotentSwine wrote:@Shaanyboi
It doesn't matter what everyone else is doing. What's right is right and that's that.


Translation:

Just bend over, don't bother fighting back.
No Avatar
03 Jun 2014 20:56

Yeah some let's play videos can be argued as helping promote the game but don't pretend all of them do. In fact sometimes it gives people an excuse for picking up the game. For example, Kid Icarus Uprising. I have friends that watch the LP for that game and say they already know the story so they aren't going to get it to play it. Sounds stupid but it happens.

Also I don't get why people say only Nintendo does this because that isn't true and people know it.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 20:59

ChozoBoy wrote:I prefer Nintendo earning the ad revenue to "Let's Players." That way, we all get better games, hardware, and events funded from it.

Do you have any idea how advertisement works? ...at all?

The money Nintendo gets from ad revenue probably isn't much. Sure, it may be a lot to most people, but to a large company, it is hardly that much. So do you really think taking ad revenue from people who spend hours dedicated to make well-put-together, informational, and still entertaining and popular videos is gonna get us anything more?
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 21:08

AndreGX wrote:
LegendofSantiago wrote:@shellshocker This is through a capture device, not MKTV (although MKTV does it as well). Youtube was able to recognize it because of the music playing. So if you do an LP without audio (you speaking over it) it shouldn't get identified, at least I think it won't


We've had videos claimed where we spoke over the entire thing

Elfteiroh wrote:Also, yeah, it's not really Nintendo that is flagging these videos, it's YouTube auto flagging it with some video/sound recognition software.


...which Nintendo provides them the information for, since they endorse the process. Nintendo is 100% involved and responsible for this. Whether or not you think that's right or not is another matter, but Nintendo is not a helpless party here.


I think most every company has to give YouTube some kind of information. For example the creator of VVVVVV, I get the feeling him or his publisher had to provide YouTube with information to begin with in order for the trailer of his own game to get flagged during the December fiasco.

Dusk wrote:Yeah some let's play videos can be argued as helping promote the game but don't pretend all of them do. In fact sometimes it gives people an excuse for picking up the game. For example, Kid Icarus Uprising. I have friends that watch the LP for that game and say they already know the story so they aren't going to get it to play it. Sounds stupid but it happens.

Also I don't get why people say only Nintendo does this because that isn't true and people know it.


Yeah Sega and UbiSoft are also common ones, and I hear Square-Enix as well. Plus I remember hearing how in late 2012 Microsoft started up a new policy that you can't monetize LPs of their games unless THEY pay you (so in other words, unless your name is "Rooster Teeth/Achievement Hunter," good luck making any money off an LP of Halo 5).
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03 Jun 2014 21:12

Eternal Rain wrote:I think most every company has to give YouTube some kind of information. For example the creator of VVVVVV, I get the feeling him or his publisher had to provide YouTube with information to begin with in order for the trailer of his own game to get flagged during the December fiasco.


Why would every company need to give YouTube their info? They have no obligation to.

Eternal Rain wrote:Yeah Sega and UbiSoft are also common ones, and I hear Square-Enix as well. Plus I remember hearing how in late 2012 Microsoft started up a new policy that you can't monetize LPs of their games unless THEY pay you (so in other words, unless your name is "Rooster Teeth/Achievement Hunter," good luck making any money off an LP of Halo 5).


It's been my experience that Ubisoft has been a great company to provide coverage of; we've received no claims from them.
User avatar
03 Jun 2014 21:21

Mochlum wrote:
ChozoBoy wrote:I prefer Nintendo earning the ad revenue to "Let's Players." That way, we all get better games, hardware, and events funded from it.

Do you have any idea how advertisement works? ...at all?

The money Nintendo gets from ad revenue probably isn't much. Sure, it may be a lot to most people, but to a large company, it is hardly that much. So do you really think taking ad revenue from people who spend hours dedicated to make well-put-together, informational, and still entertaining and popular videos is gonna get us anything more?


Well lets put it this way: Mario Kart 8 has already sold over a million copies in a short time. I don't think LPs had anything to do with those sales, but rather Nintendo themselves successfully marketing their product. On the other hand, ZombiU, a game that has been played by THE most subscribed person on YouTube, PewDiePie, still hasn't sold a single million in over a year and a half of being on the market despite him doing an LP of the game shortly after it came out. Remember, we didn't have LPs when we were growing up, we relied on good ad campaigns and reviews from trusted sources. Plus I don't believe that people like Slowbeef and other Something Awful members had LPs as "serious money making ventures" in mind when they basically created LP years ago.

Now I'll contend to this: LPs can have some effect on the sales of LITTLE KNOWN indie titles, since those games can't afford things like ads on TV, magazines, and the like, so in a way yeah LPs can basically be their unofficial advertisements. But when we're talking about "big name AAA" titles like Assassin's Creed, Mario, Call of Duty, Batman Arkham, etc, I don't think LPs really have that much of an impact on sales, as I think the large majority of the sales numbers come from people who made up their minds about buying said games long ago.

AndreGX wrote:
Eternal Rain wrote:I think most every company has to give YouTube some kind of information. For example the creator of VVVVVV, I get the feeling him or his publisher had to provide YouTube with information to begin with in order for the trailer of his own game to get flagged during the December fiasco.


Why would every company need to give YouTube their info? They have no obligation to.

Eternal Rain wrote:Yeah Sega and UbiSoft are also common ones, and I hear Square-Enix as well. Plus I remember hearing how in late 2012 Microsoft started up a new policy that you can't monetize LPs of their games unless THEY pay you (so in other words, unless your name is "Rooster Teeth/Achievement Hunter," good luck making any money off an LP of Halo 5).


It's been my experience that Ubisoft has been a great company to provide coverage of; we've received no claims from them.


First one: My only guess is that maybe they don't want people monetizing videos where the sole purpose of the video is showcasing the game's soundtrack or the cutscenes. Rockstar's said before "we don't mind LPs, but videos where all your doing is showcasing cutscenes without commentary are not okay for monetization."

Second one: Well I guess you're one of the lucky ones then, because I've seen various other sources that got UbiSoft related claims and video removals. Similarly, I've heard of people who have gotten no claims from Nintendo in any way (I believe Game Grumps and Two Best Friends Play said that nothing of theirs that's Nintendo related have been claimed, and GG is currently playing through Wind Waker HD), so I dunno... YouTube's never been consistent in this regard really. Not just gaming companies either, companies like Hasbro, Disney, and Viacom are known for having inconsistent claiming systems too.
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04 Jun 2014 02:49

SW4J wrote:What are you even talking about? You're outing yourself as having very superficial knowledge of the subject. This is youtube's algorithm detecting and flagging content, and has been a large issue for awhile. This does NOT just affect Nintendo, but all content makers. There are games from Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, and the bevvy of third parties all getting content claimed here and there. And in this case there isn't even commentary, it's straight up gameplay footage that's being monetized.
This is almost too funny. You know so little about why videos got flagged but criticize another commenter for his lack of knowledge.

The Great Flaggening of 2013 was caused mostly by a policy change reflecting MCNs, or people who were part of a network like Machinima or IGN. They were no longer given blanket protection from copyright claims, and so every video they released was now being analyzed by the algorithm and having copyright strikes applied to them. What makes it not an algorithm error though was who was applying the strikes. For most of the videos it was random third parties who were abusing DMCA by filling false copyright claims. For a brief few of them, like Terry Cavanagh, it was because they gave a network some rights to their music, and then that network started automatically issuing blanket strikes against everyone who wasn't already whitelisted.

This isn't the YouTube algorithm suddenly picking up random songs and issuing copyright strikes without Nintendo's permission. This is Nintendo telling YouTube and Google to actively seek out videos that contain any portion of this audio that aren't protected by Nintendo or directly managed by an MCN. This is why Machinima can have different Machinima-owned channels that don't get flagged, but people who partnered with them or IGN do get flagged. Talking over it does nothing as the algorithm that detects copyright music strikes is actually very good and can pick up even the quietest of background music.

Here's a pretty great, albeit long-winded, explanation of what did, and did not, change (starts around 5:28):
User avatar
04 Jun 2014 07:22

This was known and still makes controversial news.

I call clickbait on this and all further arguments like this, it's just the same stuff said over and over and over.

I tought that was only a Nintendo hater thing do to.
No Avatar
04 Jun 2014 08:19

They are not adding content, just recording video from the game and expecting to be paid. This is not an LP or anything like that. Nintendo has every right to claim copyright.

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